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Full text of "Lasell leaves"

L A S E L L 

COLLEGE 



INSIDE: 



H THE NEWSLETTER OF LASELL COLLEGE 
§ ^ WINTER/SPRING 1999 

9 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 2 

PROFILE: NEW BOARD CHAIRMAN 2 

HOLWAY CENTERS EARN REACCREDITATION. ... 3 

PEOPLE AT LASELL 4 

DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES, TOM KOERBER 5 

CAMPUS UPDATE 6 

COLLEGE PREPARES FOR Y2K 6 

SPORTS NEWS 8 

HERITAGE SOCIETY NEWS 10 

ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS 12 

ALUMNI GATHERINGS 14 

ATHLETICS CALENDAR 16 



NEW! People at Lasell . . . p, 



Degree Programs 
Restructured 

CREATION OF THREE NEW 
SCHOOLS STRENGTHENS LASELL 

Li ASELL COLLEGE HAS REORGANIZED 

its academic programs into three newly 

established schools of study, each of which 

will have an assistant /associate dean who 

will report directly to the Vice President for 

Academic Affairs, Arturo U. Iriarte, Ph.D. 

Beginning in September, Lasell will boast a 
School of Arts and Sciences, a School of Business 
and Information Technology, and a School of AUied 

See DEGREE PROGRAMS 

continued on page 9 



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College and its Subsidiary Invest 
Heavily in the Future 

LASELL COLLEGE LAUNCHES $40 MILLION BUILDING INITIATIVE 

Lasell college is investing heavily in rrs future through major 

expansion and ambitious growth. Recently, the College completed a $55.8 million bond issue 
($32 million direct construction costs) with Massachusetts Development to finance Lasell 
Village, the revenue-generating, living-and-leaming retirement community on its campus. 

LaseU Village, a 162-unit 
community spread out among 
a cluster of 14 residential-style 
buildings that includes a 
skilled nursing center, is a 
wholly-owned subsidiary of 




I 



the College and will be ready 
for occupancy in early spring 
2000. The Village, with co- 
developer CareMatrix, is the 
nation's only retirement com- 
munity dedicated to the con- 
cept of Ufe-long learning. 

Additionally, Lasell wiU 
close a smaller bond issue, 

(approximately $12 million, of which $3.5 million is 
a refunding and $7.5 miUion are direct construction 
costs) in May and draw from capital campaign pro- 
ceeds to imderwrite significant campus-wide facili- 
ty expansion and improvements. Included will be 
the construction of a new, 116-bed, suite-style resi- 



I'nil 



II! 



i 



Architect's rendering of redesigned Winslow Hall. 




dence haU, a major renovation of the Wass Science 
building and Valentine Hall, the campus dining 
haU, and the transformation of its old gymnasium. 

See BUILDING INITIATIVES 
continued on page 11 



U.S. News and World Report Ranks 
Lasell in "Top Tier" 

Lasell gained top ranking among north regional liberal arts 

colleges in U.S. News and World Report's 1999 America's Best Colleges issue. "The academic 

program at Lasell has been one of the best kept secrets and now, apparently, the secret is out,' 

says a gratified Arturo U. Iriarte, Ph.D., Vice President of Academic Affairs. 

"We are delighted to get the 
nod from the magazine. CXir 
standing in the 1999 America's 
Best Colleges issue reflects the 
commitment and dedication of fac- 
ulty and staff toward building 
more rigorous academic pro- 
grams, expanding our connected 
learrung opportunities, and 



■lEMI 



U.S. News and World Report's 
1999 America's Best Colleges 
Ranks Lasell College in "Top 
Tier" Among North Regional 
Liberal Arts Colleges 

Lasell College, the priv.ite, ccMrducaiional liberal aru college 
in Ncwion, Massachusclts. has been lanked in the "Top Tier" 
among norlhem regional liberal ails colleges in U.S News and 
Worid Report's 1999 America's Besl Colleges is 




embracing education across the curricu- 
lum." 

What made the news sweeter was 
the fact that Lasell, unranked imtil 1995, 
jumped so quickly from the third tier of 
northern regional liberal arts colleges to 
the first tier, joining a distinguished 
group of institutions which have been 
baccalaureate colleges for decades. 



SAVE THE DATE! 



See U.S. NEWS 
continued on page 4 



..for Future Alumni Gatherings! See page 14 for details. 

if i/ow go to Florida in the winter months, please be sure we have that address so you'll be certain to receive a 
Florida alumni events invitation. 



MESSAGE FROM THE 



,PRE $IDENTi 

The Changing Academic Profile at Lasell 

l^HANGE HAS BEEN A RECUPIRING THEME IN LEAVES, FROM STORIES ABOUT NEW 
programs, to new buildings and a revised curriculum; from the creation of a retirement community 
to NCAA sports and a bold capital campaign. But what about the impact of this institutional transfor- 
mation on the academic core of Lasell: its students and faculty? Beginning with this issue of Leaves, 
you will read more about plans to increase the faculty, facilitate professional development 
for faculty and ratchet up expectations from our students. 




The faculty has not been a passive observer of 
the changing academic landscape. Our signature 
o-irrio-ilum, "connected learning," was designed and 
implemented by faculty who understand the new 
expectations of employers and learning profiles of 
students. Ever responsive to the future challenges 
facing society and o\.ir graduates, faculty committees 
are wTestUng with several issues: 

• how to integrate the need for ethical-reasoning 
throughout the curriculum — as opposed to a 
one-credit course on ethics — to address both 
broad societal and career-specific problems; 

• how to strengthen LaseU's core curriculum 
(those courses required of all students which 
help to build the firm foundation for an edu- 
cated person) while introducing more flexibili- 
ty into program requirements so that students 
can more easily switch majors or take double 
majors; 

• how to establish clear expectations for each 
program ("competencies" in academic jargon) 
which every student must meet to graduate so 



that Lasell can validate its claim to send liber- 
ally educated and professionally competent 
students into the world; and 

• how to elevate the intellectual debate on cam- 
pus between and among students as well as 
faculty. 

Some of these initiatives are a response to the 
changing student body at Lasell, one that is more 
diverse, coed and brighter. Lasell is able to be more 
selective today because of the surge in interest from 
high school students. After receiving 685 applica- 
tions in the last single-sex year, the number jumped 
to 1156 last fall and an expected 1500 applicants for 
this coming September. With limited housing and a 
controlled growth plan of no more than 350 fresh- 
men and 1000-1200 total students, the admissions 
committee is becoming more selective, accepting 
between 75% and 80% of the applicants. Coedu- 
cation, connected learning, strong faculty, a modem, 
high-tech campus, a top regional ranking, and a 
vibrant student life with NCAA sports have not only 
attracted more but also stronger students; the SAT 



scores for this year's applicants are up an astound- 
ing 75 points. These students wiU expect: 

• more rigor in the classroom; 

• greater selection of upper-level Liberal 
arts courses; 

• more connected learning opportunities; 

• a vibrant honors program for the most accom- 
plished; 

• more faoilty and support services; and 

• a more robust career development program. 

As you can see, we have a fuU agenda ahead 
of us, one that will make Lasell an even better and 
more competitive college. Any thoughts on this? 
I always enjoy alumni reactions — which is why I'm 
promoting a letter-to-the-editor section in Leaves (see 
page 3). 



Sincerely, 




^^^^ 



New Chairman of the Board Rejoices in 
Her Alma Mater's Resurgence 

CAROL CACCIAMANI'S NEWFOUND LASELL ACTIVISM IS HER WAY OF "GIVING BACK'' 

HESE ARE EVOLUTIONARY, REVOLUTIONARY TIMES," SAYS CAROL CACCL\MANI '65, 
who since October 1998 has been serving Lasell College as Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 




Chairman of the Board, 
Carol Cacciamani '65 



"Our challenge at LaseU is to maintain the 
thread of history in an environment that has 
expanded with the vibrancy of its leadership — 
from President Thomas E.J. de Witt and the 
Board of Trustees, to the senior staff on down." 

"It's quite remarkable to see the College stay 
true to its core mission even as it has expanded 
its focus to include men," says Chairman 
Cacciamani about the decision in October 1997 
to admit men after 147 years. 

As an alumna who "left grateful but not pas- 
sionate about the school," Carol Cacciamani is 
struck by the dramatic changes that have over- 
taken the institution since her graduation in 
1965. "I reconnected to the College several years 
ago when I saw how well it was maturing and 
responding to marketplace needs through pro- 
grams and initiatives. I wanted very much to 
participate in what was happening here. And, 
from a personal point of view, I saw my 
renewed involvement with the College as an 
opportunity to give something back," she says. 



"When I attended Lasell as a student, it was 
a very different place. But," she laughs, "so was 
I. When I arrived on the campus, I was very 
young and very sheltered," she recalls. "And I 
absolutely had no clue about what I wanted to 
do or become." 

As it has done for so many other young stu- 
dents who thrived under LaseU's nurturing aca- 
demic attentiveness, Lasell played a significant 
part in Carol Cacciamani's development and 
future. "I think it is fair to say that the College 
helped me to really focus on myself and my 
future. In fact," she recalls with some amuse- 
ment, "it marked a true beginning for me, espe- 
cially since I was recruited from the campus." 

The job she was offered and accepted upon 
graduation was with State Street Bank and Trust 
Company, an institution she served for 32 years 
until she retired recently as Senior Vice Presi- 
dent and Director of Corporate Administration, 
a position that reported directly to the corpor- 
ation chairman. 



"Lasell gave me the confidence I needed 
to move ahead and succeed," she says. "It was 
then and is now a place where faculty, staff, 
and administration care about students and 
take pride in the programs offered." 

Carol Cacciamani continued her education 
at the School of Banking at Williams College and 
the Stonier Graduate School of Banking, carving 
out a niche in a no-nonsense industry where 
careful assessments and measured actions are 
the standards of success. 

During her tenure at State Street, Carol 
Cacciamani served as liaison to the State Street 
Bank Board of Trustees. "It was good training 
for this position," she says of her Lasell Chair- 
manship. "I am accustomed to working in a 
multidiscipline environment, and after 32 years 
in the marketplace, where change, evolution, 
and timely response are the keys, working for 

See NEW CHAIRMAN 
continued on page 5 



f 



2 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



Holway Child Study Centers at Lasell 
College Earn Prestigious 
National Merit Reaccreditation 

IhE holway child study centers at lasell college — COMPOSED OF 
the Rockwell Nursery School program and The Barn's infant, toddler, and preschool full- 
day program — recently earned a prestigious four-year merit reaccredidation from the 
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). 



The Centers were cited for their "excellent 
record of consistently maintaining a high quaUty 
program for young children." A merit reaccredi- 
dation extends the accreditation period from three 
years to four. NAEYC is the nation's oldest and 
largest organization of early childhood profes- 
sionals dedicated to improving the quaUty of 
early childhood education. 

The Holway Child Study Centers, located on 
the campus of LaseU College, serve as laboratory 
schools for Lasell's Early Childhood and 




One of the two Holway Child Study Centers: The Bam 

Elementary Education programs and are among 
only five percent of early childhood programs 
nationwide that are accredited. 

"We were delighted to earn the NAEYC 
stamp of approval," said Shirley Gallerani '53, 
director of the Holway laboratory schools. "We 
underwent an intensive self-study that involved 
collecting information from parents, teachers, 
administrators, and included detailed classroom 
observations. Additionally, NAEYC sent early 
childhood professionals especially trained to con- 
duct on-site visits and validate self-study data. All 
the information gathered was independently 
reviewed by a team of national experts who grant- 
ed the Centers their merit accreditation," 
Gallerani explained. "Our program directors, Lisa 
Landis and Kathleen Rudnicki, and aU the teach- 
ers need to be congratulated for the excellent care 
and education they provide young children on 
Lasell's campus." 

The accreditation process, which is voluntary, 
"is designed to measure whether early childhood 
programs meet or exceed national standards, and 
carefuUy considers aU aspects of program provi- 
sion, from health and safety to staffing, staff cre- 
dentials, administration, and physical environ- 
ment," explained Lisa Landis, the Centers' Pro- 
gram Director. "Stiong emphasis is put on the 
children's relationships with the staff and how the 
program helps each child grow and learn — intel- 
lectually, physically, socially, and emotionally." 

The Rockwell Nursery School has been serv- 
ing families in the Newton and surrounding com- 
munities for more than 40 years. "Teachers in both 
Holway Child Study Centers have degrees in ear- 
ly childhood education and serve not only as 
teachers of young children, but as supervisors of 



LaseU's education majors, who gain important 
experience from role modeling and working in 
the center classrooms," says Shirley Gallerani. 

"We work hard to create new opportunities 
for discovery and learning in an environment 
particularly created for the security, growth, 
enrichment and learning styles of the developing 
child," GaUerani continues. 

Experiences in art, music, math, science, dra- 
matic expression, language and readiness skills, as 
well as activities that help large and small motor 
development, are provided, based on Dr. Howard 
Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). 
Using the MI model, teachers focus on the indi- 
vidual development of every child and provide 
the opportunity and encouragement that allow 
children to explore and learn in all areas of intelli- 
gence: visual /spatial, mathematical /logical, 
musical, verbal/Linguistic, bodily/kinesthetic, 
naturalistic, interpersonal and intrapersonal. 

Rockwell children play and learn indoors 
and, weather permitting, outdoors, and enjoy 
access to many of the College's facilities, includ- 
ing the library, dining hall. Athletic Center, and 
playing fields. This five-day program consists of 
three morning classes: a three-year-old class, a 
four-year-old class, as weU as a transition class. 
School is in session from September through May. 
Morning program hours are 8:30-11:30 a.m. An 
extended day program is offered on Monday, 
Tuesday, and Wednesday afternoons until 3:00 




Shirley Gallerani '53 , director of the Holway laboratory 
schools (right) and Lisa Landis, the Centers' Program 
Director. 

p.m., and Thursday and Friday until 1:00 p.m. 
An eight-week summer program, available dur- 
ing June and July, runs from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

At the Bam, where the uifant and toddler pro- 
gram is housed, the teachers care for one group of 
infants, two groups of toddlers, and two classes of 
preschoolers. School is in session year-round from 
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 
The Centers are closed for all major holidays, for 
the week between Christmas and New Year's, and 
the week before Labor Day. 

The Barn Center also provides access to 
College facilities, and these additional environ- 
ments are an important extension to and enrich 
the Centers' programming for children. "Parents 
can find in our center a place of trust to leave their 
young children, particularly those who are very 
young and nonverbal," Gallerani stated. ^ 



We Want to Hear 
from You! 

NEW FEEDBACK FEATURE FOR 
ALUMNI AND FRIENDS ... 

With this issue, leaves 

inaugurates a new column called 
"Questions for the President." 

This new feature, which will be includ- 
ed in each issue of our alumni publication, 
will provide readers with the opportunity to 
"talk to the President" and pose questions, 
raise concerns or promote new ideas relating 
to the CoUege, its programs, and people. 

A sampling of types of questions is 
included below. We invite you to add your 
voice to the dialogue at Lasell and we look 
forward to hearing from you. 

Please forward your thoughts to: 

President Thomas E. J. de Witt 
Lasell College 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 
^ Newton, MA 02466 

or e-mail him at: Tdewitt@Lasell.edu. 

In the interest of space, all letters may 
not be published and those that are may be 
edited. 

Questions for 
the President 



As an alvmma of LaseU CoUege, am I 
entitled to any special benefits if I 
move into LaseU ViUage? 



% 



/ We are delighted that several LaseU 
alumni have already made the deci- 
sion to call Lasell ViUage home when it 
opens its doors late next spring. As a LaseU 
alumna you are entitled to your first 
month's maintenance fee for free. Once you 
take residence you, and aU members of the 
LaseU Village community, will share the 
same benefits and privileges including: -^ 
access to Lasell College classes, programs 
and facilities; flexible restaurant-style din- 
ing; housekeeping services; personaUzed 
wellness and fitness programs designed 
by a personal trainer; and scheduled local 
transportation. For more information, 
contact LaseU VUlage at 617/243-2323. 

My son is thinking of applying to 
LaseU next year. Does he have a better 
chance of being admitted since I am a grad- 
uate? 

Each applicant to LaseU is held to the 
same acaderruc standards. His admis- 
sion will be determined by the strength of 
his application. If he is accepted, however, 
you can take advantage of the Legacy 
Program. Children and grandchildren of 
Lasell alumni are entitled to a 10% discount 
in tuition. We have a long legacy of multi- 
ple generations attending LaseU College. 
Perhaps the two of you wUl be able to boast 
the same accomplishment in the not too 
distant future. 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 






Murder, She Wrote 

M,M.RHDD.CUPPH, ASSOCIATE 

Professor in the Liberal Arts /English 
Depcirtment, has been using her year's 
sabbatical to author A Development 
on Nantucket, a murder mystery that 
is nearing completion. 

With a fertile imagination and a passion 
for fiction, the long time summer visitor to 
Nemtucket decided to weave together a rich 
tapestry of mayhem by focusing on the enor- 
mous changes she has witnessed on the island 
over the years. 

"The conflicts caused by the volatile real 
estate market seemed to have great potential 
as a background for murder," Professor 
Reddicliffe explains. "The 'development' of 
the title refers partly to the physical changes 
on Nantucket. However, developments take 
place in many ways. My protagonist is Suzanne 
Mayhew, the mother of two teenagers, who has 
to deal not only with her divorce, but with her 
children's reactions to their father's departure. 
When he is murdered, Suzanne feels compelled 
to take an active role in the investigation. 

"The real estate market on Nantucket forms 
the background to the story, but the focus of the 
novel is on the characters and how Suzanne and 
her children deal with the murder." 

Professor Reddicliffe hopes the book wHl be 
the first in a series of riveting Svizanne Mayhew 
mysteries, and admits to already plotting her 
next murder most foul. »- 



Dr. Stephen Sarikas, Associate Professor, 
Liberal Arts Science Department, recently pub- 
lished an article, "AIDS Awareness at a Small 
College for Women," in the Journal of Health 
Science. This article was co-authored by Ann 
Heiselberg '93, who, as a student of Dr. Sarikas, 



U.S. NEWS 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

U.S. News began ranking colleges and univer- 
siti^ in 1983 to "help high school students choose 
a school where they can thrive," according to the 
magazine. 

The publication bases its college rankings on 
a number of measures of academic quality that 
fall into seven broad categories: academic reputa- 
tion, student selectivity, faculty resources, student 
retention, financial resotirces, alumni giving, and, 
for national universities, graduation rate "perfor- 
mance." U.S. Nezvs ranks colleges and universities 
using three steps. First, the colleges are catego- 
rized by their mission and region. Second, data 
is gathered from each institution relating to 16 
indicators of academic excellence. Each factor is 
assigned a weight in the ranking formula that 
reflects the magazine's judgments about which 
measures of quality matter most. Third, the col- 
leges in each category are ranked against their 
peer group, based on their composite weighted 
score. U.S. News publishes the individual ranks 
of only the top schools in each category; the 
remainder is grouped into tiers. >•- 




Associate Professor of the Liberal Arts Science 
Department, Dr. Stephen Sarikas 

assisted him with the first drafts and the statisti- 
cal analyses. 

"The paper described the results of the first 
five years of the study (1990-94) and included 
data showing that general knowledge of HIV 
disease improved during the five year period," 
Dr. Sarikas explains. "However, there was one 
troubling result: although most students were 
able to identify high-risk behaviors, including 
unprotected sex, the majority said that they did 
not use condoms on a regular basis. Of those 
surveyed, the vast majority favored mandatory 
HIV testing in a health care setting." 

Dr. Sarikas is continuing his HTV awareness. 
"I distribute the questionnaire to freshmen dur- 
ing fall orientation each year, and now that the 
College has become coeducational, I am begin- 
ning to collect data from male respondents." Dr. 
Sarikas wiU be on sabbatical in spring 2000 and 
plans to devote much of his time researching 
and measuring his findings and authoring a 
paper on his conclusions. 

AdditioriaUy, Dr. Sarikas is writing a laborato- 
ry manual for college students on anatomy and 
physiology. With some 22 chapters already com- 
pleted, and used in his LaseU laboratory sessions. 
Dr. Sarikas expects to use some of his sabbatical 
time to move the book project to completion. 

Lisa Pass, MS, OTR/L, a lecturer in the OTA 
Department, has been selected to be an in-house 
reviewer for Slack Inc., medical publishers from 
Thorofare, New Jersey, for a new pediatric publica- 
tion "Pediatrice Treatment Activities Guide." 

Assistant Professor Lisa Harris, assistant 
dean of the Allied Health Programs, used last 
spring's sabbatical to work on her doctoral 



research that examines an educational model to 
teach health care providers how to be effective 
patient educators. "It is based on principles in 
educational psychology and addresses other 
aspects such as mvilticultural sensitivity, psy- 
cho/social considerations and medical ethics — 
subjects I teach at LaseU in the course, 'Topics in 
Patient Care,'" Professor Harris explains. 

Her research compared LaseU students on 
internship who had gone through the model 
with students who had not. With permission 
from their internship sites, students tape-record- 
ed treatment sessions for analysis by Professor 
Harris. 

"As part of the research I surveyed curriculum 
content of patient education in PT undergraduate 
and graduate programs as weU as PTA associate 
level programs." Professor Harris has been invited 
to present her findings at the National American 
Physical Therapy Conference, in Washington DC, 
in June 1999. She is currently working on publish- 
ing her research. 

Kenneth Hayes recently joined the CoUege 
community as Assistant Director in the Office 
of Student Financial Planning. Working with 
Director Daniel Barkowitz, Mr. Hayes wiU be 
involved in aU aspects of the student aid process. 
He comes to LaseU from Emerson CoUege where 
he served as the school's Loan Officer for several 
years. Prior to his work at Emerson, he was 
employed in the Educational Lending Division 
at BankBoston. He holds a Master of Arts degree 
from Emerson in creative w^riting. 

Lasell's Center for Public Service continues 
to attract a broad range of students who give 
their time weekly (some two times a week) to 
serve diverse communities. This semester, more 
than 100 students participated. Many tutor in the 
Center's Monday-Thursday literacy programs, 
some go to Mother Caroline Academy to tutor 
middle school girls, whUe others go to the ChUd- 
ren's AIDS Program in Dorchester to offer their 
care and expertise. For a new program. Best 
Buddies, seven students are paired up with de- 
velopmentaUy disabled adults and spend 
one-on-one time with them. 

Last Veteran's Day — a hoUday for most — 
LaseU's Center and the CoUege's Athletic com- 
munity paired to bring 55 youngsters from the 
inner city to the LaseU campus for a "Kids to 
CoUege" day — combining athletics, residence 
haU tours, and Uteracy events. 

Dean of Student Affairs, Diane Austin, 

assumes the presidency of the Boston Symphony 
Association of Volunteers (BSAV) in mid-May. 
"I've been the Executive VP for the last year, and 
my term as president wiU be a two-year term. 
There are approximately 800 volunteers in the 
Boston area and another 1200 at Tanglewood — 
and the BSAV has been responsible for raising 
over $1 miUion for the BSO each of the last three 
years." As President, Dean Austin sits as an ex- 
officio member of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra's Board of Trustees and its Board of 
Overseers. 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



...PEOPLE 




Director of Facilities and Public 
Safety, Tom Koerber. 



Never a Dull Day. . . 

DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES/PUBLIC SAFETY THRIVES ON DAILY CHALLENGES 

A.LTHOUGH HE HAS TWO SONS OF HIS OWN, TOM KOERBER OFTEN 
thinks of himself as a surrogate Dad to the nearly 700 young men and women on the 
Lasell College campus. When there's a problem or concern at Lasell, it is often Koerber 's 
phone that rings first. 

As Director of Facilities and Public Safety, 
Koerber ministers to the covintless situations that 
arise on a thriving college campus that brings 
together rambunctious young adults, faculty, and 
staff. "I work closely with the Dean of Student 
Affairs to deal with issues of responsible behavior 
and ensure the safety and weU-being of our stu- 
dents," he explains. "I also oversee the physical 
plant issues, from electricity and plumbing mainte- 
nance and repair to landscaping, snow removal, 
building restoration, and new construction. 

"It's a 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week 
kind of job. I'm happy to report that there is 
really no such thing as a typical day here," 
Koerber reports proudly. A 15-year LaseU 
CoUege veteran, Koerber likes the variety his 
job provides. "I can go from dealing with a stu- 
dent's appeal about a parking ticket, and super- 
vising a heating systems repair, to helping a 
student who is coping with personal safety. I 
love what I do," he says, and credits his boss, 
Elizabeth Winter, vice president of Business and 
Finance, for much of his w^ork-related enthusi- 
asm. "She provides wise leadership and lets me 
use my instincts and creativity. I've learned a lot 
from her in the 14 years I've worked with her." 

From bats in the attic, boilers and boat hous- 
es, to lost keys, parking problems, fire safety, 
and more serious public safety concerns, we get 
the calls," says Koerber, who with administra- 
tive assistant Meghan EHvan, his staff of security 
officers, and the bmldings and grounds crew, try 
to keep LaseU ticking Uke a precision clock. 

"This is a place of change. When we went 
coed in September 1998, we talked about having 
20 or 30 men in the first year class. Well," 
Koerber laughs, "It was more like 90 men, and 
we expect another 100 next faU. We've grown 
fast, but I see the change as being extremely 
positive. Our faculty and staff have done a great 
job transitioning. The interaction between men 
and women students on this campus has been 
wonderful." 

Every aspect of physical plant management 
comes \inder Koerber's purview, including over- 
seeing the major building renovations currently 



scheduled for 
Wass and 
Winslow 
Halls, and the 
construction 
of a new resi- 
dence hall to 
accommodate 
Lasell's bur- 
geoning stu- 
dent popula- 
tion. 

Although 
he wears sev- 
eral hats at 
Lasell, the 
Boston State 
College graduate, former Marine, and licensed 
Coast Guard Captain (he runs a fishing charter 
service during his off time), calls construction 
his first love. 

"At Lasell, working with the older buildings 
and taking care of the Victorians provides seri- 
ous satisfaction," Koerber admits. "We've 
worked hard to maintain the Victorians as 
authentically as possible," he explains. 

He tells the story about the major renovation 
to Gardner House that preserved the richly 
ornate woodwork that distinguishes the build- 
ing's interior. "We took the woodwork down 
piece by piece. We disassembled the entire liv- 
ing room and put it together again like a jigsaw 
puzzle. It was a huge endeavor, but the result 
speaks for itself. It is a beautiful building and the 
effort was very much worth it." 

One of Lasell's most visible goodwill ambas- 
sadors, Koerber is often seen at community 
meetings with Ruth Shuman, dean for Institu- 
tional Advancement, talking about how Lasell is 
working to make campus growth and construc- 
tion as neighbor-fiiendly as possible. "We try 
really hard to be good neighbors." 

Koerber's 'sell' to neighbors isn't forced. "I 
value what I do here and the people I work with. 
I love this College," he says simply. "I am really 
invested in the place." »- 



Dr. Iriarte Is Keynote 
Speaker at Chilean 
Conference and 
Named as Trustee of 
San Juan Medical ^ 
School 

IlJr. arturo u. iriarte, vice 

President for Academic Affairs, participated 
as a ke5mote speaker at the Third Annual 
International Conference of the Corisejo 
Superior de Educacion in Santiago, Chile 
on September 23-25, 1998. ^ 

This year the conference focused on issues 
related to accreditation and quality control. The 
conference was co-sponsored by the Consejo 
and the United States 
Embassy (through 
the United States 
Information Agency). 

As an "interna- 
tional expert," Dr. 
Iriarte was asked to 
spend two days work- 
ing with senior admin- 
istrators of colleges 
and universities 
throughout Chile, 
identifying approach- 
es to institutional self-study and evaluation. He 
also visited with the Minister of Education and 
other members of ministry staff to discuss the 
development of a national accreditation system. 
As a direct result of his visit. Eh-. Iriarte has been 
invited to serve as a member of a soon to be estab- 
lished international accrediting commission. 

Additionally, Dr. Iriarte has become a 
Trustee of the San Juan Bautista School of 
Medicine in Caguas, Puerto Rico. The San Juan 
Bautista School of Medicine is a private medical 
school accredited by the Council on Higher 
Education and by the Board of Medical Exam- 
iners of Puerto Rico. In February 1998, the 
school was granted candidacy for accreditation 
status by the Middle States Commission on 
Higher Education. *•- 




Dr. Arturo U. Iriarte, Vice 
President for Academic 
Affairs 



NEW CHAIRMAN 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 

Lasell, where so much is happening in such a 
good way, seems a good place for me to put my 
energy and enthusiasm." 

She is especially excited about the new initia- 
tives Lasell is undertaking. "This is no sleepy little 
college," she affirms, ticking off the College's ros- 
ter of ambitious undertakings. 



Included is the completion of Lasell Village 
and the creation of the Donahue Institute for 
Values and Public Life that will tackle issues of 
civility, on-campus and off. Additionally, "there is 
the conversion of Winslow Hall into a modem 
high-tech center, the building of a new residence 
haU, as well as the renewed emphasis on faculty 
development, and the growing success of Lasell 
150, the Campaign to Celebrate Lasell's Sesqui- 
centennial. Each aspect has special importance 



individually and collectively in the life and 
longevity of Lasell," she says. 

"My biggest role as Chairman is to ensure that 
I'm lending support to administration needs dur- 
ing a time that is uniquely dynamic. I am here to 
help sustain the rrussion and vision that have rein- 
vigorated LaseU and made it an institution that is 
attracting record numbers of students who under- 
stand the value of a Lasell degree," Carol 
Cacciamani explains. »• 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 



Tampus 




Wm&L 



College Prepares for Y2K 

STUDENTS FROM PC 105 ASSIST WITH CAMPUS-WIDE MILLENNIUM 
BUG AUDITS 

Y2K. . .THE MILLENNIUM BUG. . .DOOMSDAY 2000. WHATEVER YOU CALL IT, 
the much touted computer-chip-related, date-sensitive calculation glitch is the news of the 
year. Some say the forecasted microchip-driven malfunctions will simply be a nuisance. 
Others, however, warn that it may bring the end of the world as we know it. 

booted anytime after December 31, 1999, its BIOS 
will assume that the year is 1900 and pass an 
incorrect date to the operating system. 

"While the basic problem is simple, the fallout 
can be extensive," Gelch explains. "The task at 




"We are taking Y2K seriously at Lasell," 
explains Director of Information Technology, 
Deborah Gelch, who believes year- 
date, Y2K problems will be more of 
y/^^ \^ a major nuisance than anything 
/ / / j^\ else. "We are undertaking an 

I /OmeCtea y intensive inventory of aU 

j/ campus equipment, from com- 
puters and printers to faxes and 
software," she explains. "The tele- 
phone system, with more than 600 
stations, must be audited for Y2K compliance. 
Adding to the mix of potential complications is 
the time/day stamped voice mail that attaches to 
each phone." 

PC software problems relate to glitches that 
can reside in critical applications or stored data. 
"Preparing for Y2K is a big job, certainly, but we 
feel confident that we can meet a September dead- 
line for all electronic equipment audits to be com- 
pleted. More than 200 computers on campus must 
be tested. Additionally, there are printers, faxes, 
and servers to be put through their tests for Y2K 
compliance. Videocassette recorders in the aUied 
health labs most probably are affected," Gelch 
explains. At the same time. Director of Facilities 
and Public Safety Tom Koerber and his Buildings 
and Groimds staff are focusing on related issues, 
including timers that drive heating systems and 
elevators. 

Gelch and her staff, Sharon Cobum, Rick 
Brown, and Karyn Godin are making the Y2K 
issue a fertile arena for connected learning by pro- 
viding hands-on experience for students enrolled 
in required PC105 computer classes. 

Under their supervision, students are making 
a project of Y2K compliance-checking, from 
researching information about equipment on the 
Internet, making calls to manufacturers for Y2K 
compliance policies, to actually running systems 
checks. 

"Our students are getting involved in the 
basic hardware and systems audits, so they can 
learn about computers from the inside out, in the 
context of a reed-world situation," Gelch explains. 

"The basic problem that Y2K spawns is rela- 
tively simple. Because computer programmers in 
the 60s designed code to recognize only two digits 
(computer memory was exper\sive in those days), 
non-compliant computers today wUl not be able 
to recognize or calculate dates after 2000. So, a 
date of 2049 wotdd register as 1949 by a non- 
compliant computer. " 

Students are putting PCs through BIOS (Basic 
Input/Output System) and real-time clock checks 
to ensure that all campus PCs have correct central 
clocks and calendars. Most machines sold within 
the past two or three years do recognize the year 
2000 on their own, but older PCs can't. When 



hand is to inventory electronic systems, ascertain 
which of the software and hardware are not Y2K 
compliant, and determine which of those are suit- 
able for repair, replacement, or upgrade." »• 



What You Can Do to Prepare for Y2K 

By Deborah Gelch 

Lasell College Director of Information Technology 

L ROFESSIONAL IT DEPARTMENTS AND CONSULTANTS ARE FRANTICALLY 
preparing their companies for the Y2K bug. But many people don't know where to 
start to ensure their household electronics will be Y2K ready. Following is a guide 
to get you started preparing your home for the coming millennium. 




Lasell Director of Information 
Technology, Deborah Gelch 



The University 
of Notre Dame's 
Embedded 
Processes web site 
(www.nd.edu/ 
~y2k / examples / 
embedded.html ) 
has six questions 
that you can ask 
yourself about 
your home elec- 
tronic devices to 
determine if they 
may be a candidate 
to have the Y2K bug. These questions are: 

l.Does it operate with electricity? 

2. Does it have a battery or power supply? 

3.Does it have a display? 

4. Does it have a microprocessor? 

5. Does it have a calendar? 
6.Does the device use the calendar to 

schedule events? 

Low risk devices are those such as televi- 
sion sets, stereo equipment, computer moni- 
tors, microwave ovens and printers. High- 
risk devices are computers, fax machines, 
VCRs and camcorders. 

The easiest way to identify whether your 
home electroiucs are subject to the Y2K bug is 
through the Internet. As a resxilt of the Year 
2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure 
Act, passed by Congress and signed into law 
by President Clinton October 19, 1998, com- 
panies are required to provide data to con- 
stimers about each of their products. This 
information must include whether they are 
affected by the Y2K bug, and if they are, what 
the problem will be and how, if possible, to 



fix the problem. (The text of the law may be 
found at: www.y2k.gov /new /y2kact.html.) 
Most major producers of equipment with 
electronic components have Internet web 
sites with Y2K irvformation readily available. 
The easiest way to find them is to run a 
web search or try to reach their web site 
by specifying www.companyname .com. 

If you own a computer that is more than 
a year old, you should verify that your hard- 
ware and software are Y2K compliant. If you 
have access to the Internet at home, work or 
your local library, visit the manufacturers' 
web sites to check for Y2K problems. The 
sites are easy to find. Examples of a few 
are www.gateway.com, www.dell.com, 
www.ibm.com, www.compaq.com and 
www.microsoft.com . Other electronic items 
in your house that could have a Y2K problem 
are electronic equipment such as camcorders, 
VCRs, and even washing machines and dry- 
ers! Examples are Sony ( www.sel.sony.com/ 
SEL/legal/y2k.htm), Panasorvic ( www.pana- 
sonic.com/MECA/y2k/uidex.html) and 
Maytag ( www.maytag.com/2000.asp) . Of 
course, if you do not have access to the Inter- 
net you may also get this information by call- 
ing or writing the companies in question. 

Y2K problems with devices other than 
computers are rarely troublesome. Most 
home appliances are not materially affected 
by the change to the new millennium. In most 
cases, if there is a problem, the clock portion 
of the appliance becomes inoperable. 

Still, it is nice to know that the informa- 
tion about these items is as close as your 
fingertips! ^ 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



CAMPUS 



Groundbreaking Ceremony Makes It Official 

LASELL VILLAGE VISION BECOMES REALITY 

It WAS FITTINGLY SYMMETRICAL. ON OCTOBER 29, 1998, 77- YEAR-OLD SENATOR 
John Glenn, the first American to orbit earth in 1962, returned to space on the space shuttle 
to pursue his love of lifelong learning and discovery. At the very same time, on a sun- 
soaked esker in Aubumdale, planners, implementers, and enthusiasts of Lasell Village 
celebrated the launching of the premier living and learning retiremient community nestled 
on the campus of Lasell College. 

including a number of Lasell College alumni. Says 
Carol (Benel) Newton '46, "I love the concept of 
Lasell Village. All the better retirement communi- 
ties offer good services and amenities, but it's 
the learning program at the Village that really 
sets it apart." 

Lasell Village's ever-increasing community 
of future residents already has begun serving in 
important roles. A resident advisory council has 
formed to help plan various aspects of Lasell 
Village life. Residents have been hosting monthly 
open houses to meet with people who want to 
learn more about Lasell Village. And they have 
been teaching courses for the recently established 

Lasell Institute for 
Learning in Retirement, a 
part of the Elderhostel 
Institute Network, which 
will eventually be head- 
quartered at Lasell 
Village. 

In March, Lasell Vil- 
lage held the first major 
event in its mission to 
serve as a cultural and 
intellectual resource for the 
Greater Boston area, as well as the nation. The 
Millennium Summit was a gathering of Lasell Village 
residents and friends of the coimnunity, who held 
facilitated discussions to reflect on major life-altering 
events of this century and to make predictior\s for the 
coming millennium. The event was hosted by noted 
WBZ broadcast personality Dave Maynard, well- 
known to many as the emcee of "Community 
Auditions." The Millennium Summit launched a 
year long oral history program that residents will 
take to area schools. It also served as the starting 
point for gathering items for a time capsule that wiU 



The groundbreaking celebration at the site of 
the Village drew nearly 300 celebrants, including 
future LaseU Village residents, Lasell College 
administrators, faculty, students, and local digni- 
taries. 

Construction crews have been busy ever since 
on the 13 acres of campus where Lasell Village, 
a not-for-profit continuing care retirement com- 
munity, is scheduled to open in the early part of 
2000 — making a long-cherished vision an excit- 
ing reality. 

At the ceremony, Newton Mayor David 
Cohen officially welcomed Lasell Village to the 
City, saying he looks forward to Lasell Village 




Window bays and brick gables topped with cast stone detailing accent each building; 
steeply pitched roofs complete the architecture. 



beconung "Newton's fourteenth village." A very 
special moment was the moving performance by 
future Lasell Village resident Dorothy Halpem, a 
retired concert pianist, who treated the crowd to 
several pieces on a grand piano that was brought 
to the site for the event. 

Lasell Village will feature 162 spacious apart- 
ment homes, spread out among 14 buildings that 
will dot the landscaped setting. Designed in the 
manner of an English village, the community wiU 
feature a town hall complete with a clock tower, 
walking paths, and a pond. All the buildings will 
be interconnected by enclosed walkways, so that 
residents can walk from one to another without 
needing to go outside. 

A unique, defining aspect of Lasell Village is 
its commitment to providing learning opportuni- 
ties in an tntergenerational environment. Under 
the direction of Dr. Paula Panchuck, academic 
dean for Lasell Village and former interim dean 
for Academic Affairs as well as professor of 
Education at Lasell College, each resident will 
receive an individualized learning program, 
tailored to his or her special interests. Options for 
learning can incorporate favorite pursuits, such as 
travel, the arts, or creative writing, as well as par- 
ticipation in a cross-section of classes, many 
alongside traditional age matriculating Lasell stu- 
dents. 

This aspect of Lasell Village life has been the 
reason many of its future residents have chosen it. 




Lasell Village under construction. 

be placed at Lasell Village. 

Fun has been an important part of LaseU Village 
life, as well — social events for residents have includ- 
ed concerts, a lifestyle fair, a Charles River cruise. 




Assisting at the groundbreaking are (1 to r): Jennifer Brooks, 
Lasell College Student Body vice president; Andrew 
Gosman, president of CareMatrix; Ann Mignosa, Lasell 
Village future resident; David Cohen, mayor of Newton; 
and Tom de Witt, president of Lasell College. 

and a Valentine's chocolate fest. 

Interest in Lasell Village continues to gain mo- 
mentum; currently, more than 72-percent of its apart- 
ment homes are reserved. Lasell Village Operations 
Director Steven J. Cohen recommends that people 
who have been considering living at the convmunity, 
reserve their apartments now. "It wiU allow you the 
greatest choice of styles and locations." Additionally, 
Lasell CoUege alumni are eligible for special savings 
incentives. 

Lasell Village is spor\sored by Lasell 
College and is being developed and managed 
by CareMatrix Corporation, a national senior 
living provider based in Needham, Massachu- 
setts. For more information on Lasell Village, 
caU (617) 243-2323. ?•- 



Lasell College 
Bookstore Enjoys 
New Location and 
Its Online Presence 

LiASELL COLLEGE'S DONAHUE 

Bookstore has been relocated to its 

new home on the groim.d floor of the 

Edwards Student Center across from 

the mailroom. 

Additionally, 
the Bookstore is 
taking up some 
virtual floor space on 
the Lasell College web 
site, where visitors can browse through, & 
select and purchase t-shirts, Lasell teddy 
bears, and other items boasting the Lasell 
logo. Visit the online Bookstore at 
http://www.laseIl.edu/store/store.htm ^ 




WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 



7 



SPORTS NEWS 



Reinvigorated Athletics Program Builds v 
Visibility^ Credibility 

-TOLLOWING THREE YEARS OF PROVISIONAL MEMBERSHIP, LASELL COLLEGE IS 
now enjoying its first official year as an active National Collegiate Athletics Association 
(NCAA) member. 




Lasell's reinvigorated athletics program — 
composed of four men's and five women's teams — 
has had an exciting start. "It's been great," says 
Athletic Director Kristy Walter. "The newly config- 
ured program has added a great deal to the athletic 
center and to the campus. People stay on campus 
on the weekends and attend varsity games. We're 
getting more visibQity and more local recognition. 
There are more games and more teams covering a 
greater variety of sports. The newspapers that cover 
our games are spelling our name right. The increas- 
ed growth and visibility have given the athletic 
program more credibility." 

Women's Basketball 

Women's basketball had a promising 
season and demonstrated that it is 
team building its prowess and skUl. 
Although it finished with a record 
of 8-15, the team had a much- 
improved year, scoring an aver- 
age of 60 points per game, 
compared to a 42-point aver- 
age last year. "They played 
in a lot of very close 
games," says Walter. • 

Under talented Head 
Coach Tracy Downs '93, 
the team placed third in 
its conference, and won 
the Tip-Off tournament 
it hosted. Standout 
players included fresh- 
man Jennifer Lesnick, 
who scored 42 points 
in one game, including 
10, 3-point goals. She 
averaged 15 points per 
game, ranking second in 
the conference with this 
statistic. Another outstand- 
ing player was Siobhan 
Smith '01 who, at 71%, is 
ranked first in the conference 
for free-throw percentage. 



Anthony Scarsella. Dean had the most goals for 
the team (9) and Anthony had the most assists 
(also 9). Freshman goalie Jordan Scaccia had a 
goal against an average of 2.76. 

Women's Soccer 

Coach Barmy Yee's women's team finished 
second in the conference with a 5-11-1 record. 
The leading players were Karla Smith — most 
goals (7), Emily O'Connor — most assists (10), 
and goalie Jill Petercuskie — goals against (4.3). 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 
HIGHLIGHTS! 



MEN'S 

BASKETBALL 

HIGHLIGHTS! 



• Lasers Win Lasell Tip-Off 
Tournament 

• Siobhan Smith named to 
AU-Toumament Team 

Lasers Beat Wheelock and 
Bay Path (Lasell lost to 
these teams last year) 



Women's Volleyball 

Under Coach Mary Tom, women's volleyball 
had the best record in Lasell's recent history, fin- 
ishing at 12-6. The women are looking forward to 
conference play next year and have their sights set 
on winning the North Atlantic Conference. Sopho- 
more team captain Melissa Wilson led the team in 
assists. For the fall '99 season, Lasell plans to add 
women's field hockey and men's volleyball. 

Lacrosse and Softball 

Two sports that are just getting started are 
men's lacrosse and women's Softball. Under 
Coach Kevin Tyska (lacrosse) and Coach Bob 
McBCinley (softball), both teams have been 
practicing indoors since mid-January. 
"The lacrosse team will be playing 
all their home games on GrelHer 
field, " Walter says. The 

lacrosse team has been prac- 
ticing early mornings and 
late evenings in the gym 



Men's Basketball 

The men's basketball team, consisting 
of all new players, also had a great season. 
With Coach Mike Catapano leading the way, the 
team achieved a record of 14—11. They scored an 
average of 82 points per game, led by freshman 
Pat McTomney who averaged 17. Another notable 
player was Pierre Francois '00 who averaged six 
rebounds per game. 

Men's Soccer 

In the world of soccer, the men's team fin- 
ished with a record of 5-11-2. Coach Giovanni 
Pacini had a team of 20 players, an impressive 
number considering that all are first year players. 
Leading the way were freshman twins Dean and 



First year player, Jen 
Lesnick scores 42 points 
against Bay Path 

Lasers finish third in NAWC 
Championships (Lasell 
finished 5th last year) 

• Senior Tonya Pickett is named 
to the All-Tournament Team 

• Jen Lesnick Averages 14.6 
points/game for the season. 

• Siobhan Smith shoots 71% 
from the free throw line 



Record for first year 
is 14-11. 

• Pat MacTomney 
averages 16.5 
points/game 

• Lasers beat MIT 
65-62 

• Pierre Francois 
pulls down 144 
rebounds for 
the year 

• Joe Sander grabs 69 
steals for the year 



to prepare for the 
upcorrving season. 

The softbaU team 
has been throw^ing in 
the gym, swinging 
at the batting cages, 
and the pitchers 
and catchers have 
attended pitching 
clinics to prepare 
for their spring 
season. All of their 
home games will 
be played on 
Taylor Field. 



Pierre Francois has 
35 blocked shots 
for the year 



Oral Francis 
shoots 76% 
from the line 



Team averages 60 points /game (last 
year's average was 42 points/game) 



Cross-Country 

This was the first year LaseU sponsored varsity 
cross-country teams. Even though they competed 
separately, the men's and women's teams often 
seemed to function as one. They worked under one 
coach, Hannah Bruno, and attended all meets and 
several local runs together. Both teams participated 
in the Jeffrey Curley run in Cambridge, "just because 
they wanted to," explains Kristy Walter. 



Athletic Center 

The Athletic 
Center has been among 
the busiest buildings on 
campus, according to 
Kristy Walter. "The gym is 
constantly scheduled. In fact, 
the month of February offered a 
unique challenge because we had 
spring sports practicing in the gym 
before basketball season was over, and 
the fall sports teams wanted to implement a 
spring season. 

"It really has been a great year for athletics at 
LaseU," Walter continues. "The men and the 
women have been extremely supportive of each 
other. The teams support each other and atten- 
dance is up at all home games. There were several 
basketball games where the gym was absolutely 
packed." The spring sports seasons should be 
very exciting. We encourage everyone to come 
out and support our teams. ^^ 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



SPORTS NEWS 



New Coaches join 
Lasell Athletics 

. ATHERINE KIDD HAS BEEN 
appointed Head Coach of women's soccer 
and also coaches the under 12-year-old 
girls team for the Spirit of Massachusetts, 
a premier soccer club. 

Other coaching experience includes the 
Newton North High School freshman girl's 
team and Assistant Coach for M.I.T. women's 
varsity soccer. Ms. Kidd plays soccer year- 
round in many leagues including the Eastern 
Massachusetts Women's Soccer League and the 
Greater Boston Soccer League, which is coed. 
She has been playing soccer since the age of six. 

Ms. BCidd, who earned her M.A. degree in 
Irish studies from Boston College and her B.A. 
degree in Anthropology from Texas A & M, is 
currently employed full-time at LaseU College 
as Campaign Assistant for Lasell's capital 
campaign, which was created to celebrate the 
school's sesquicentennial in 2001. "I am delight- 
ed to have the opportunity to coach at an aca- 
demic institution where 1 already have a vested 
interest," she says. "With the energy and enthu- 
siasm being created on this campus, we can 
reaUy push ourselves and go much further than 
we have in the past." 

Jessica Cormier, has been appointed Head 
Coach of women's field hockey. She was previ- 
ously an assistant field hockey coach at Bentley 
CoUege, where she guided her team to champi- 
oriship seasons in both the East Coast Athletic 
Conference and the Northeast 10 for 1997 and 
1998. She earned her B.S. degree in Marketing 
from Bentley College, where she was a Division 
n all- American field hockey player for two 
years, as well as Northeast 10 Player of the Year 
in 1997. 

Ms. Cormier is currently employed full- 
time at Cran Barry, Inc. of East Boston, a 
manufacturer and distributor of field hockey, 
lacrosse, and cheerleadtng uniforms and equip- 
ment. "I am excited about bmlding a new 
program at Lasell College and look forward 
to getting started in the fall," she says of her 
new position. 

Bob McKinley has been appointed Head 
Coach of women's Softball at Lasell. McKinley 
has been involved in softball as a player, a 
coach, and as an administrator for more than 
20 years. Active with the American Softball 
Association's Junior Olympic Softball Tour- 
nament, he also coaches Winchester Youth 
Softball and the 18-and-under teams that fre- 
quently qualify for the New England Cham- 
pionships. McKinley, who works with Softball 
Tech, which is composed of current and former 
coaches at the high school and college levels, 
has also coached at various softball camps and 
clinics. 

Bob McKinley, who graduated from Boston 
State College in 1977, has been a Cambridge 
firefighter for more than 25 years. He is married 
and the couple's four children have aU played 
high school and college sports. His youngest 
plays softball for Bryant College. »- 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Health. The School of Arts and Sciences will 
include Humanities, Science and Math, Social 
Sciences, Education, and Justice Studies. The 
School of Business and Information Technology 
wUl include Accounting, Business Admini- 
stration, Hospitality Management, Fashion and 
Design, Finance, Marketing, and Management 
Information Systems (MIS). The School of Health 
Sciences will serve as the umbrella for Physical 
Therapist Assistant, Occupational Therapy 
Assistant, a pending bachelor's degree in occu- 
pational therapy currently awaiting develop- 
mental program status approval from the profes- 
sional accrediting agency. Health Care 
Administration, Exercise Physiology, and 
Athletic Training. 

"The reorganization brings Lasell more 
in line with traditional four-year colleges," 
explains Dr. Iriarte, who recommended the reor- 
ganization. "Additionally, the creation of three 
new assistant /associate deanships will improve 
efficiencies and strengthen the lines of communi- 
cation among students, faculty, and staff. 

"We are pleased that the Board of Trustees 
has approved the change. We are also delighted 
that outside evaluators, most notably a visiting 
team of educators from area institutions sent on 
behalf of the Massachusetts Board of Higher 
Education to review our new programs, continue 
to commend Lasell for its vitality, its optimism, 
and its sense of community. Our plan is to 
increase our full-time faculty by 30% over the 
next two years in order to strengthen existing 
programs while enriching the setting in which 
students can learn and excel," said Dr. Iriarte. 

Part of the ongoing academic transformation 
process includes developing improved assessment 
procedures to ensure that connected learning is 
fuUy integrated into the curriculum. Lasell is also 
addressing the need to continue to modernize facili- 
ties, improve working conditions for the faculty, 
and expand professional development opportuni- 
ties for both faculty and staff. 

Currently, students at Lasell may choose 
from more than 25 challenging academic pro- 
grams. Built on a solid liberal arts foundation, 
each program combines professional courses 
with a core currictilum that emphasizes critical 



thinking, effective communication skills, ethical 
development, and computer literacy. 

As a student in any Lasell program, one is 
expected and guided toward connecting class- 
room theory with career reality in on-campus 
training facilities and national internship sites. 
Most important, students attend small coopera- 
tive classes, taught by dedicated professors who 
encourage academic excellence and recognize 
individual learning styles. "We believe that all 
of these elements create a dynamic learning envi- 
rormient that is stimulating, highly interactive 
and, above all, challenging," says Dr. Iriarte. »- 



LASELL OFFERS PROGRAMS IN: 



Accounting 

Athletic Training 

Business Administration 

Business Management 

Criminal Justice 

Daycare Leadership 

Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

Exercise Physiology 

Fashion Design & Production 

Fashion and Retail Management 

Finance 

General Studies 

Health Care Administration 

Health Science 

Hotel and Travel Administration 

Human Services 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

International Business 

Legal Studies 

Liberal Arts 

Marketing 

MIS 

Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Paralegal Studies 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Special Education 







LASELL COLLEGE 








Vice President/ 
Dean for Academic Affairs 












1 






1 


1 




•HiiiSjiSk 




School of Arts 
& Sciences 


School of Business 
& Info Tech 


1 School of 1 
1 Allied Health 1 




■^■KSBffi55S^iW 
















Humanities 




Business Mgt. 
Administration 




Physical Therapist 
Assistant 




r • j'^f:- 




1 Academic Computirg 




Science & IVIath 




Hospitality 
Management 


Occupational 

Therapy 
Assistant /OT 


y 


sCenter for | 
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WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 





Katharine A. Umer '83, 
director of Campaign and 
Gift Planning. 



SMART SOLUTIONS 

TO COMMON QUESTIONS: 

SHOULD YOU REVIEW YOUR 
ESTATE Pi A M<i? 

It is said that 70% of Americans die without 
a Will. Under these circumstances, the state in 
essence writes a Will for you: a Will that may not 
accomplish your wishes and certauily will not help 
you save estate taxes. But that is a topic for another 
column. My concern at the moment is for the rest of 
us: the savvy 30% who draw up Wills, lock them 

away in oxir safe 
deposit boxes, and 
check off as done one 
more unpleasant life- 
task. 

The problem wdfh 
this approach is that 
things change over 
time. Estate tax laws 
are modified, initial 
beneficiaries may die, 
and inflation and the 
passage of time erode the value of bequests made for 
a specific doUar amount. The following is an excerpt 
from a letter I received recentiy from the executrix of 
the estate of a very loyal alumna. 



DearKathy, a h l 

,s so small. I cannot now, i^?«."^' !" ^ ^^^^ had a vower of 
doZk thai when I v^as cannsfor^ ^^ „ ^,^,tant^al 
Imey) that I had sent a V^^'^y^'^''^^^^ i Had her mil m 

% fries, hut I had - V -;//;;,,„ note of the amount 
theheirs were). I v^^sh that I ma ^^^^ ^^^i, 

% lasell and her ^^-^^^f^^^'^n the WH ^as wntten 
\mz was alive. 1 ^^VPOsenl^V^^ ^^^ ^^ ^, ^^w, 

$1,000 and $100 seemed sornewm I J ^ ^^^ 

Ind certamly her stocks and h^ndsw ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ,^, 
twentyyearsago.Somayh^rjF^^^^^ 

they don't seem quite rf'^"^ helpfulness. Settling 
Thank you so much for your W ,^ ^^^^ 

---' ^n^^^'X at r^me you spent looUng 
"l^ the book," and! ^r^^ ^^^,^t, tax savings). 

^rvos^lc ^^l^^X^:ouldntfeel so guiUyl 
Had you found a big one. 

Sincerely yours, 

M.S. 



Two Gifts Totalling $591,000 Establish 
Charitable Remainder Trusts for College 

GLOBETROTTING PRISCILLA SPENCE HALL '43 AND HUSBAND D. ALLEN HALL 
FIND MANY WAYS TO SUPPORT LASELL 

Jr* OR SOME COLLEGE GRADUATES, COMMENCEMENT MEANS A DWINDLING 
commitment to an institution from which they gained nurturing, education, and a future. 
But Priscilla Spence Hall '43 and her husband, D. Allen Hall, have long memories and 
grateful hearts. 




L 



D. Allen and Priscilla Hall. 



See GIVING & RECEIVING 
continued on page 11 



With jaunts 
on the Con- 
corde, the 
Orient Express, 
and the Sea 
Goddess, the 
two avid globe- 
trotters enjoy a 
life filled with 
exotic destina- 
tions and excit- 
ing modes of 
travel. Still, the 
couple never is 
too busy or too 
far away to 
support the 

institution from which Priscilla graduated in 
1943, and for which she holds so much affection. 

Allen Hall — who served in the United 
States Marine Corps in the South Pacific and wit- 
nessed the flag raising on Iwo Jima — and 
Priscilla Hall — who was a travel agent in Miami 
and escorted numerous groups throughout 
Eiirope and the Middle East — feel strongly 
about Lasell. As a result, the couple gave 
stock valued at $306,000 to establish a 
Charitable Remainder Trust in honor of 
Priscilla's 55th Reunion in 1998, and to sup- 
port Lasell 150, the Campaign to Celebrate 
Lasell's Sesquicentervnial. 

"Lasell had a strong influence on my 
life and on my future," says Priscilla. 
"Allen and I wanted to do something con- 
crete for the institution; something that 
would have some lasting value and go 
beyond the commitments of time." 

A longtime, enthusiastic volunteer 
involved in LaseU's governance, Priscilla 
is currently a College Overseer and a 
Trustee on the Board for Lasell Village, 
the trend-setting live-and-leam retire- 
ment community the College has 
spawned. She is also a member of the 
Heritage Society, the organization that 
honors those generous individuals who 
support Lasell through life-income 
gifts, charitable bequests, and trusts. 
Additionally, it was Priscilla Hall who 
became the first member of the 
Chairman's Council, the Annual Fund 
giving category beginning at $10,000, and she 
maintains an active profile in Lasell 150, by serv- 
ing on a campaign committee and through her 
magnificent philanthropy. In fact, Priscilla and 



Allen recently decided to create a second charita- 
ble remainder trust in March 1999 with stock 
valued at $285,000 to benefit Lasell. 

"We considered other recipients for our 
charitable remainder trust gifts, but Lasell has 
had the most effect on my life achievements. 
It seems important to set aside funds for the 
College," Priscilla explains. "Once we under- 
stood how a Charitable Remainder Trust 
worked, we decided that it would be a good 
fit for our situation by providing us with a tax 
shelter and a reliable future." 

In both October 1998 and March 1999, the 
Halls made irrevocable tiansfers of highly 
appreciated stock to fund the trusts. The Halls 
are beneficiaries of the trusts, which are man- 
aged by Lasell's tiust partner, MeUon Private 
Capital Management. 

The Halls chose the rate of return to be 
paid — a much better rate of retiim than they 
would have received from the stock — and the 
length of time they would receive income from 
the trust. The couple opted to receive income 
for the rest of their lives, although other terms 
are possible. 

Charitable Remainder Trusts also have sig- 
ruficant tax benefits for the Halls. Because the 
tiusts have a charitable component, the Halls 
avoid paying capital gains taxes on the sale of 
their stock. Additionally, the Halls are eligible 
for a tax deduction for their charitable contiibu- 
tion based on IRS calculations of the present val- 
ue of the amount that will eventually revert to 
Lasell. 

There are still more benefits accrued to the 
Halls as a result of their generous philanthropy. 
By taking a large portion of assets out of their 
estate, the Halls have the added advantage of 
gaining income from money without actually 
owning it. "This aspect held particular appeal 
because we like the idea of Lasell receiving the 
benefit instead of the U.S. government." LaseU 
will receive the remainder of the funds in trust 
when both Priscilla and Allen have passed away. 
The amount will depend on a combination of 
how the stock market performs over the years 
and the length of both PrisciUa and Allen's life- 
times. 

In recognition of their leadership generosity, 
Lasell will rename Vista House to Spence House 
in October 1999. Priscilla decided to use Spence, 
her maiden name, so she could honor the memo- 
See GIFTS 
continued on page 15 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



#«srar® 



New Major Gifts Officer Hired 

CATHERINE A. BLACK JOINS INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT STAFF 

C^ATHERINE A. BLACK HAS JOINED THE E^STITUTIONAL 
Advancement staff as Major Gifts Officer. Ms. Black comes to Lasell 
from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where she served as planned 
giving officer, responsible for developing and implementing strate- 
gies for cultivating and soliciting planned gifts. She has also worked 
at Simmons College, first in the Office of the President, where she 
was coordinator of special events and office manager, and later in . ^ officer 

the Development Office, as assistant director of Annual Giving. Catherine a. Black 

She graduated from Bryant College, Master of Science in Coirtmunicatioi\s 

Smithsfield, Rhode Island, with a Bachelor of Management from Simmons College. ^ 

Science in Business Administration, and earned a 




BUILDING INITIATIVES 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Winslow Hall, into a high-tech classroom and fac- 
ulty center with a glass-enclosed courtyard. 

The College, currently in its first major capital 
campaign, has already increased the campaign 
goal from $10 million to $12 miUion, due to the 
unprecedented support of alumni and friends, 
who raised more than half the goal during the 
campaign's early planning stages. 

LaseU, which began accepting men in 
September 1998, has been attracting record num- 
bers of applicants since it expanded its nussion to 
coeducation. In the fall 1997, its last year as a 
women's college, LaseU received 685 applications. 
The subsequent fall, the first year of coeducation 
for the College, applications burgeoned to 1150. 
"Five years ago, half of LaseU's students were 









1 




LASELL COLLEGE $40 MILLION BUILDING INITIATIVE 


«r 




Residence Hall 

Winslow Hall renovation 
(high-tech center) 

Valentine Dining Hall 
expansion s»w- 


$5,000,000 
$2,500,000 






$750,000 


! 

' 1 




Wass Science Hall 
renovation 


$250,000 


1 




Lasell Village 


^^$32,000,000 


■s^s, . ^ 




TOTAL 


$40,500,000 











commuters," explains LaseU President, Dr. 
Thomas E.J. de Witt. "Today, 90 percent of our 
appUcants request campus housing. With enroU- 
ment growing at approximately 100 students a 
year and with anticipated enrollment in 2001 — 
the CoUege's sesquicentermial — at 1000, we need 



to continue to provide appropriate housing, with 
'port per pUlow' cormectivity to the Internet for 
every student." Currently, LaseU offers port per 
piUow network connectivity to virtuaUy aU of its 
resident students. 

LaseU, which had rented out a number of its 
houses over the past years, has already reacquired 
four buUdings that wiU be converted back to addi- 
tional student housing. "The new residence haU 
wiU eliminate much of the pressure we are experi- 
encing in the area of student housing," Dr. de Witt 
said. Recently, some $2 miUion of capital campaign 
proceeds was invested in technology as weU as to 
complete the expansion of the Edwards Student 
Center, add air conditioning to Brennan Library, 
and construct the new GreUier athletic field for the 
CoUege's NCAA Division m Soccer, Lacrosse, and 
future Field Hockey competitions. 

Construction contracts for the CoUege's 

newest bmlding initiatives 
wiU be signed in the spring, 
with buUding and renova- 
tion expected to be complet- 
ed before the faU of 2000. 
"This flurry of con- 
struction should not distract 
the CoUege from its 
main priority," says 
President de Witt. "Our 
focus during the next five 
years wiU be squarely on 
academics, as we strengthen 
the Ubrary, increase the 
number of terminaUy- 
degreed faculty, and 
expand our programs." 

"This is an institution 
very much on the move," 
President de Witt continues. 
"The faculty and students 
beUeve in LaseU. A visiting 
team of educators from area 
institutions sent on behalf of the Massachusetts 
Board of Higher Education to review our latest 
program offerings cited LaseU for its community 
optimism and vitaUty. There is a shared vision 
among our constituencies — a mutual sense of 
direction. The enthusiasm is almost palpable." ^ 



GIVING & RECEIVING 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 

Her letter (used with permission) dearly under- 
scores why a one-time approach to estate planning 
doesn't work. It also suggests that bequests based on 
a percentage of one's estate (as opposed to a specific 
doUar amount) often make more sense over time. 

Estate planning experts typicaUy advise re- 
viewing your WUl every five years. Specific events 
that should also trigger a review are changes in 
famUy relationships (re-marriages or chUdren, for 
example), changes in state or federal laws, and a 
change in state of residence. 

Keep in mind that you may also want to 
review your specific bequests as the size of your 
estate changes. Depending upon the total value of 
your assets, you may want to consider making per- 
centage bequests or using more sophisticated estate 
planning techniques, such as a charitable remain- 
der trust. 

Charitable remainder trusts have several bene- 
fits, including the avoidance of probate for assets 
in the trust, elimination of capital gains taxes for 
assets donated to the trust, reduction of estate taxes, 
and an income stream to the trust's beneficiaries. 

PrisdUa Spence HaU '43 and AUen HaU (pro- 
filed on page 10) discovered that a charitable re- 
mainder trust at LaseU CoUege provided a good 
solution to their estate planning objectives. In addi- 
tion, the Halls' trust enabled them to make a mag- 
nificent gift in support of Lasell 150: a Campaign to 
Celebrate LaseU's Sesquicentermial. Now that's a win- 
win situation! 

Note: Lasell College is not qualified to provide legal 
or tax advisory service. Information in this column is 
offered in general terms and should not he acted upon 
without professional advice from your own qualified 
advisors. 



For more information on how gift planning 
can benefit you and LaseU, please caU 
Katharine Umer '83, director of Campaign 
and Gift Planning, at (617) 243-2166 or fUl 
out this form and maU to: 

The Heritage Society 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

Lasell College 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Lasell Gift Annuities 

Charitable Trusts 

Charitable Bequests 

Heritage Society Membership 

Gifts of Appreciated Securities 

Name: 



Class: 




Address: 


City: ^^P 


State: Zip: 
Telephone: 


All responses will be held in strictest confidence. ^ 





WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 1 1 



ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS 



Class of '43 Canoe 
Restoration Project 

"Most important so far as sports were 
concerned zvas canoeing. In 1882 the "Juniata 
Boat Club" was formed by five girls, for the 
Charles River was the ideal place for canoeing 
and on spring and fall loeekends the river was 
crozoded xoith canoes. Under the supervision of 
Miss Ransom, the sport of canoeing became a 
major one at Lasell. By 1888 the Canoe Club, 
as it was then called, grew to over double its 
original size, and by the beginning of the next 
century the canoe races in the so-called Indian 
war canoes became one of the major events of 
the late spring season." 

— Donald Winslow, from Lasell: 
A History of the First Junior College for Women 




B, 



BELOVED SYMBOLS OF LASELL'S 
past, the College's six "war" canoes are 
a proud reminder of a bygone era. 
Today, the handsome canoes are 
brought out for a ceremonial River Day 
race on the Qiarles River each October. 

A Canoe Restoration Fund has been 
launched to support their reconditioning. Two 
have been fully restored and Jean Lee '49 and 
Nancy Putnam '50 are planning to underwrite 
the reparation of two others. Each will boast a 
plaque honoring the donor or donors who 
contributed to the restoration. 

At Reunion '98, members of the class of 
'43 resolved to honor the late Nathalie Monge 
Stoddard, their long-standing class representa- 
tive, with the restoration of one of Lasell's 
beautiful old war canoes. Nathalie Stoddard 
had planned to attend the 55th Reunion but 
passed away jtist before. A wonderful, well 
Uked, capable friend, Nathalie was an enthusi- 
astic crew team member at LaseU, serving as 
captain from '41-'43 and the head of crew in 
'43. 

The cost for the restoration of the canoe is 
$1800. To participate in this special gift please 
make a contribution no later than December 
31, 1999. Your gift to the canoe restoration — a 
special remembrance for Nathalie — would be 

See RESTORATION PROJECT 
continued on page 13 



!* 



Survey on Women's job Transition 
Underscores Challenges and Opportunities 

W HILE PREDICTING THE FUTURE IS BEST LEFT TO TEA LEAVES, TAROT CARDS, 
and crystal balls, recent trends in women's career paths and relevant statistical data can shed 
helpful insight on what the future may hold. 



"Professional Women in Job Transition," a 
survey conducted by five Lasell College seniors 
in the Fashion Merchandising class of Assistant 
Professor Sarah Scavone, is a subject of immediate 
concern for any woman who envisions a change 
of direction. 

The study, with the primary focus on Lasell 
alumni between the Classes of 1967 and 1979, 
attempts to determine their personal and profes- 
sional accomplishments since graduation, their 
perceptions of themselves and their current work 
place, and their plans for future achievements. 

With the assistance of Alumni Affairs 
Director Karen Gill, students extracted a list of 
Boston area alumni and called every third name. 
To produce and collate the statistical data, they 
met each day for the four-week fall course. The 
class also invited top women executives from 
Reebok, Dunkin Donuts, Neiman Marcus, Staples, 
and WCVB TV to share their different perspec- 
tives on the business world, from buying and 
human resources to marketing and coirmiunica- 
tions. 

From their analysis of the statistical data, for- 
mally presented in the Bragdon Room, the class 
discovered that the biggest change in attitude 
toward women in the workplace came with the 
1960s and 1970s graduates. For example, 70 to 
80% of the 1940s and 1950s graduates agreed with 
the statement, "a woman's place is in the home," 
while only 20 to 30% of the later classes con- 
curred. 

Using Lasell College yearbooks, students 
studied the content and analyzed the quickly 



changing attitudes they conveyed. From 1967 
to 1969, green-and yellow-colored yearbooks 
showed a calm academic environment with 
women uncertain of their roles and the purpose 
of their education. The 1970 through 1974 black- 
colored yearbooks, which the class interpreted 
as symbolic for anger and strength, portrayed 
anti-war and anti-government feelings, strong 
female images, and the prevalence of drugs and 
alcohol. From 1975 to 1979, school pride began to 
soar with the women's rights movement visually 
dominant. 

The project surmnary underscored the major 
challenges facing women today. "By far, the 
biggest issue that we encountered was the deci- 
sion for a woman to stop her career and start a 
family," says Sarah Scavone, who is making the 
survey the first of a five-year study and plans to 
publish her findings. 

The class paid considerable attention to the 
issue of self-esteem. "As women in transition 
from one phase of life to the next," Scavone points 
out, "their self-perception has an enormous im- 
pact on future employment opportunities." In all, 
Sarah Scavone was pleased with the results. "It 
was one of the best classes that I've ever taught," 
she concludes. For next fall, she plans to broaden 
the study's scope beyond Boston, by introducing 
the effect of geography on job placement. 

So if you graduated between the years of 
1967 and 1979, get ready to talk... a senior may be 
calling you! ^ 



Alumni Board of Management Opportunity 

If anyone is interested in joining the LaseU Alumni Inc., Board of Management, please contact the 
Alumni Affairs Office. The mission of the board is to serve the interests of Lasell College, to aid 
deserving students, to promote a spirit of fellowship among its graduates, past students, facility and 
the administration, and to bind alumni to the College more closely for their mutual benefit. 



Alumni Directory Questionnaire ^. 

In anticipation of Lasell's Sesquicentermial (150th) Anniversary in 2001, Lasell wiU be publishing 
an Alumni Directory. We are hoping to make the new edition of the Lasell Directory as compre- 
hensive as possible. Not only does it provide an opportimity to share your geographical location 
with your friends and acquaintances, but the directory can serve as a valuable networking docu- 
ment to help you find other alumni in your business field. 

Within the next few months, you will be receiving an alumni directory questionnaire from 
Publishing Concepts, Inc. Please respond promptly with the iriformation. Thank you for your 
participation! 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS 




Annual Fund Updates 

THE ANNUAL FUND REACHES OUT OVER THE PHONE 

By Noni Linton, Director of Annual Giving 

A.T LASELL, STUDENTS ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE. AND JUDGING BY THE 
consistent increase in Annual Fund giving, Lasell's capable cadre of student phoners are 
doing everything right. 

As many of you know from your contact 
with dedicated phoners who spend two to three 
evenings a week on the telephone, Lasell's 
Phonathon program has been growing for the 
last few years, reconnecting alumni in all 
decades. 

Our phoners, including Jaime, Lauren, Leah, 
Mindy, Shannon, Tara, Shelby, and Liz, begin 
their calling during the early hours of the even- 
ing to thank our regular donors and encotirage 
other alumni to become regular donors, letting 
them know the importance of each and every 
gift. Also, and more importantly, our phoners 
spend time with alumni, teUing them about their 
own LaseU experience and listening about Lasell 
in the decades of the 20s through the 90s. 

Many alumni-student connections are made 
through these conversations, as graduates who, 
perhaps, have not been in touch with LaseU 
recently, rediscover their akna mater through 
the enthusiastic descriptions by current students 
who bring the Lasell experience full circle. It is 
through these cormections that many new 
donors are moved to make their first gifts to 
Lasell, thereby increasing alumni participation. 

Participation is a key ingredient in the future 
success of Lasell's fundraising. Not only does it 
broaden the donor base and therefore the total 
raised, it also helps Lasell compete for grants 
from foundations and corporations for special 
projects. Often, these foundatioris and corpora- 
tions in the grant awards selection process 
consider the strength of alumni philanthropy 
to the CoUege. 

A measure of the success of the Lasell 
Annual Fund, and especially the phonathon pro- 
gram, can be seen in the steady increase in donor 
participation, particularly this year. Currently 
there are more than 400 new donors to the 
Annual Fund. Every 100 gifts represent approxi- 
mately one percentage point in calculating alum- 
ni participation. 

And with the announcement of the Lasell 150 
Campaign in June 1998, the role of the phona- 
thon program has assumed even greater 
importance. 

What does the Lasell 150 Campaign have to 
do with the Annual Fund? In fact, the Annual 



RESTORATION PROJECT 

CONTINUED FROM PACE 12 

separate from an Annual Fund gift. Please make 
checks payable to LaseU CoUege and maU to 
Catherine Kidd, Campaign Assistant, LaseU 
CoUege, 1844 Commonwealth Avenue, Newton, 
MA 02466. 

One remaining canoe is stiU avaUable for 
underwriting. If you or members of your class 



Student phonathoners celebrate skyrocketing Annual 
Fund totals at Haskell House. 

Fund is an integral part of the Campaign, with 
the objective of broadening participation in this 
Fund and raising at least $2,000,000 of the 
$12,000,000 goal. Gifts to the Annual Fund pro- 
vide vital funds each year for student financial 
aid, academic programming, library resources, 
athletics, ongoing campus maintenance and 
much more. 

In the next two years, our student phoners, 
and those who join them, wiU help spread the 
excitement that this ambitious campaign is gen- 
erating on the campus. As renovations are com- 
pleted and more are begun, it is easy to "catch 
the spirit" of excitement for all that is happening 
at LaseU. Over the spring break, the stairway 
connecting all three floors of the Edwards 
Student Center was completed and opened for 
use. Simultaneously, Donahue's Bookstore 
moved from its temporary quarters in Winslow 
Hall to a newly created space on the Edwards 
Student Center ground floor adjacent to the 
mailroom. (Read about more planned projects 
elsewhere in this issue.) With each new project, 
made possible by the Lasell 150 Campaign, 
excitement buUds and spreads throughout the 
campus community and to the alumni reached 
by the student phoners. 

So, when you receive a caU from Jaime, 
Shannon, Shelby or any one of our student 
phoners please teU them about your memories 
of LaseU, ask them about their experience and 
contribute as generously possible. ^ 



would Uke to contribute to the class of '43 restora- 
tion project, or wish to restore the remaining canoe 
in your name or that of your class, please caU 
Catherine at (617) 234-2154 or PriscUla HaU at 
(904)423-4441. »- 



Lasell Admission 
Alumni Management 
Program 

ASELL COLLEGE ALUMNI NOW 
have a unique opportunity to assist with the 
College's admission efforts in attracting high- 
ly qualified students. The LaseU Admission 
Alumni Management Program (L.A.M.P.) 
makes it easy for alums to participate several 
different ways, including: 

• Identify prospective students and refer 
them to the Admission Office. 

• Correspond with prospective students via: 
telephone, letters, and e-mail. 

• Represent LaseU CoUege at coUege fairs 
and high school visits. 

• Make "congratulation caUs" to students 
who have been accepted to LaseU. 

• Review local newspapers for news of 
outstanding high school students and 
refer articles to the Admission Office. 

To join L.A.M.P., and to help LaseU CoUege 
move into the future with positive involvement 
and interaction among our alumni, administration, 
prospective students and appUcants please com- 
plete and return the form below. You wiU soon 
receive updated information from the Office of 
Admission. »• 



JOIN L.A.M.P. 



Please cUp and return to the 

Office of Admission, LaseU CoUege, 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue, 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Yes, I want to join L.A.M.P. and 

work with the Office of Admission to 

attract qualified students. 

Name: Class Year: 



Maiden Name: 
Major: 



Home Address: 



Telephone: (_ 
Work: 



Occupation: 
Employer: _ 



E-maU address: 



Please Ust the names of three high schools that 

are close to your home: 

1. 



2.. 
3. 



Please check the level of involvement Usted 
below in which you are interested: 

□ Identify Students 

□ Make Congratulation Calls 

□ Correspond with Prospective Students 

□ Send Newspaper Articles to the Office 

Q Attend High School Fairs/High School Visits 

When was your most recent campus visit? 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 



^3 



Throughout the year, the President and members 
of the Institutional Advancement staff travel 
around the country to meet with alumni of all 
ages at Lasell gatherings. It's a chance to meet 
and network with other alumni in your geo- 
graphic area while also hearing the latest infor- 



ALUMNI GATHERINGS 



mation about Lasell. Recently, many spouses/ 
guests have been attending these events and 
they have enjoyed hearing about their partner's 
college life. Friendships are renewed and also 
begun. Please contact the Alumni Affairs Office at 
(617) 243-2139 if you can help to provide ideas. 



JUNE, 1999 

4-6 Friday-Sunday 

Aubumdale, MA 

REUNION WEEKEND 
at Lasell CoUege campus 

27 Sunday 

Bergenfield, NJ 

Alumni and Family picnic 

Contact; Stormy Horton Bell '92 



SEPTEMBER, 1999 

16 Thursday 

Providence, RI 
The Hope Club 
Contact: Ruth Blaisdell Simmons '44 

25 Saturday 

Cape Cod, MA 

Contact: Janet Wyman Meade '51 



OCTOBER, 1999 

14 Thursday 

Boston Stock Exchange 



Vermont 

Contact: Beverlee Pembroke Hill '65 

21 Thursday 

Pembroke, MA 

Contact: Bob Kates 



organize an event, etc. The office creates and 
mails all invitations, so as host, all that is needed 
is to receive the RSVP replies and make some fol- 
low-up phone calls. 



NOVEMBER, 1999 

6 Saturday 

Hartford, CT 

Hartford Golf Club 

Contact: Joan Pethybridge Thompson '57 




A gathering at a nearby restaurant followed a presentation and tour 
of the American Stock Exchange in New York City. Susan Parrish '92 
served as the contact person for the event. 




The West Falmouth home of Joan Conradi McLaughlin '59 and her husband, 
Robert, was the setting for a Cape Cod gathering in August. 




The Boston area young alumni gathering was held in 
September and Marie Smith, director of Career Services; 
Cathanne Bemegger Potvin '90; Sandra Davidow '82, Kate 
O'Connor, dean for Enrollment Management; and Kristin 
Melone '92 explored some networking possibilities. 



Ruth Shuman, dean for Institutional Advancement; 
Richard and Susan Halewood Crosby '67 and Jerry Dumais 
'02 at the Cape Cod reception in September. Barbara 
McAlary Kashar '60 served as host. 




The Ct. Valley group met in November at the Shuttle Meadow 
Country Club in Kensington, CT. Marilyn McGuire '52 was 
the host. 




Trustee Richard Flier and his wife , Susan, (Left) graciously hosted an alumni gathering at their Brookline home (Right), prior to visiting the Monet 
Exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts. 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



j;y. 



HMf. , 



SE 



"Not Your Ordinary Raffle'' to 
Benefit Alumni Scholarship Fund 

A.T REUNION WEEKEND, ON JUNE 5, 1999, LASELL ALUMNI 
Inc. will conduct the drawing for its seventh annual "Not Your 



t 



i 



Ordinary Raffle" to raise money for much needed scholarships for 
deserving students. Last year, more than $6,600 was raised from 
the sale of tickets for 45 prizes worth in excess of $5,000. Prizes 
received to date are: 



PRIZE 

$100 gift basket 

$100 Cash prize 

$100 Savings account 

$100 Gift certificate 

$25 Gift certificate 

$35 One-year membership 

$100 Two tickets to a performance 

$40 Four tickets for admission 

$25 Gift certificate 

$40 Gift certificate 

$250 Gift certificate 

$100 Cash prize 

$100 Cash prize 

Three $35 gift certificates 

$100 Cash prize 

$100 Cash prize 

Two $50 flower arrangements 

$450 Callaway Titanium Golf club (driver) 

$175 14K pearl brooch 

$190 Two nights' stay 

$100 Gift certificate to L.L. Bean 

$192 Linda Rose Hand Care Collection 

Dinner for Two 

$100 Gift certificate to Marriott Hotel 

$150 Overnight stay and breakfast 

$43.50 Gift certificate 

$200 Birdsey Watercolor 

Autographed hat by star player 

$100 Gift Certificate 

Artwork 

$45 Gift certificate 

$100 U.S. Savings Bond 

Two tickets to a performance 

One year subscription to Want Advertiser 

$100 Gift certificate 

Guest appearance on TV show 

$48 Two tickets for one '99 performance 

$400 Carry on Hartman Luggage Bag 



DONOR 

Allied Domecq Retailing USA, 

Robert Huntington, Trustee 
Anonymous 

Aubumdale Cooperative Bank 
Baby Place, Susan Young Charton '69 
Back Bay Restaurant Group 
B.J.'s Wholesale Club 
Boston Lyric Opera 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts 
Bullfinch's 
Diva Salon 
Dover Rug Co. 

Nancy Lawson Donahue '49, Trustee 
Champe Fisher, Trustee 
Gleason's Flowers 
Arthur Gregorian, Trustee Emeritus 
Arthur Gregorian, Trustee Emeritus 
Jacqueline Paulding Hauser '50 
Kathleen Hegenbart, Trustee 
Hill's Jewelers, Sudbury 
Lasell Inn Bed & Breakfast 
fean Sargent Lee '49, Trustee 
Sharon LeVan '66, Overseer 
Longfellow's Wayside Inn 
Kathryn Morgan Lucey '67 
Marriott Hotel, Newton 
Kevin Max Hair Design 
Barbara Stickle Mode '47 Interiors 
New England Patriot's Foundation 
Pillar House 
Renjeau Galleries 
Queen Sheba 

Ruth Shuman, dean for Inst. Advan. 
Turtle Lane Playhouse 
Nancy Curtis Grellier '49, Trustee 
Weston Nurseries, Inc. 
Susan Wornick, Channel 5 TV 
Worcester Foothills Theatre 
Patricia Zinkowski, Trustee 



NOT YOUR ORDINARY RAFFLE 



Name: 

Address: 
City: 



Class: 



(Include maiden) 



State: 



Zip: 



Phone: 



e-mail: 



Winner need not be present. 

L_ 

r:iFT<; 

CONTINUED FROM PACE 10 

ry of her grandmother who made it possible for Priscilla to attend college. 
Mrs. Spence was a doctor of chiropractic in the early 1900s — along with 
her husband and son, Priscilla's father — and practiced in New York City. 
When she passed away, she left money for Priscilla and her brother to 
attend coUege. 

For information about how charitable remainder trusts, or any other 
planned giving instruments, can benefit LaseU College and your estate 
planning, please call Katharine Umer '83, Director of Campaign and Gift 
Planning at 617-243-2166. »- 






We are very grateful to our donors! If anyone has an item they would like 
to donate for the '00 raffle, please contact the Alumni Affairs Office. 

To participate, cut out coupon (photocopy if more raffle tickets are needed) 

and mail with a check ($5 per entry or $20 for five entries) made payable to: 

Lasell Alumni Inc., 1844 Commonwealth Ave., Newton, MA 02466-2716. 



REUNION '99 



Re«union 



re - yoon - yen /noun (1610) 



1 : an act of reuniting: the state of being reunited 
2: a reuniting of persons after separation 

3 : the return of a group of people for a special occasion to a 
place formerly frequented or regarded as home. . . 

La*sell CoUlege "a-sei kaiij(i85i) 

1 : a co-ed, four-year professionally oriented liberal arts institution of 
higher learning which has come a long way since you were here... 

2 : an organized body of persons engaged in a common pursuit with 
mutual interests, i.e., getting back together for an 
ail-alumni Reunion! All years welcome! 



June 4-6, 1999 



(617)243-2139 • fax (617) 243-2142 ' alumni@lasen.edu > www.lBsell.edu 



All Alumni are irivited to Alumni Weekend '99, 

especially those whose year ends in "4" or "9". 

June 4-6, 1999. Program of Events includes: 



• Lasell Night at the Pops 

• Tours of campus 

• Class Parade and Pictures 

• Medallion Presentations 

• Reunion Luncheon 

• Alumni College 



• President's Reception 

• Alumni Photography Exhibit 

• Lobster Bake and 
Karaoke/Nostalgia Night 

• Duck Tours of Boston 



NAMES OF REUNION CLASS 
COORDINATORS* AND AGENTS: 

Board of Management Reunion Chair Nancy Cincotti Emmons '58 
'19, 24 & '29 Alumni Office 



'34 — 65th *CeUa Foss 



Virgirua Leahy Berwick 



'39 — 60th *Virginia Thomas Baxter Jean Michael Petersen 



'44 — 55th *Dottie Tobin Staffier 



Ruth BlaisdeU Simmons 



'49 — 50th *Nancy Curtis Grellier Nancy Lawson Donahue 

Jean Sargent Lee 
Joan Weiler Amow 

'54 — 45th *Carol Rof er Hofmaim 

'59 — 40th *Carlene Hintlian NeweU Joan Conradi McLaughlin 

'64 — 35th *Carol Bradley Sullivan Kathleen Rebmann Royka 

'69 — 30th *MaryAnn Mitchell Beaver 

'74 — 25th "Elaine Goldman 

'79 — 20th *Lisa Harkiits Iran 

'84 — 15th *Mary Beth Bacon SartoreUi 

'89 — 10th *Jodi Humphrey 

'94 — 5th *Gina Aloisi 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



LASELL COLLEGE SPORTS CALENDAR 



(Listings that appear in all caps denote home games. Occasionally, 
due to xveather, etc., dates and time? may change. For confirtnation, 
please check ivith the Athletics Department at 617-245-2147.) 



WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 1999 



WOMEN S SOFTBALL 1999 

April 

2 Lasell vs. Wheelock College 
6 Lasell vs. Lesley College 

8 Lasell @ Emerson College 

9 Lasell @ Daniel Webster College 
13 LASELL vs. JOHNSON & 

WALES UNIVERSITY 
16 LASELL vs. PINE MANOR COLLEGE (2) 
20 LASELL vs. RIVIER COLLEGE (2) 
25 LASELL vs. BAY PATH COLLEGE (2) 

27 Usell @ Wheelock College 

28 Lasell @ Lesley College 

May 

1 NAWC TOURNAMENT 

2 NAWC TOURNAMENT 



MEN'S LACROSSE 1999 

April 

2 Lasell vs. Stevens Tech ® New Canaan HS, CT 

6 Lasell @ Wheaton College 

10 LASELL \s. CASTLETON STATE COLLEGE 

14 LASELL vs. UMASS DARTMOUTH 

16 Lasell @ University of New Haven 

19 Lasell vs. University of New England 

23 Lasell ® Dowling Tournament 

24 Lasell @ Dowling Tournament 
26 Lasell @ Currv CoUege 

30 LASELL vs. FRANKLIN PIERCE COLLEGE 



MF^J'^'^OCCER1999 



September 

5 Sunday 
7 Tuesday 
11 Saturday 

16 Thursday 
18 Saturday 

21 Tuesday 
25 Saturday 

29 Wednesday 

October 

6 Wednesday 
9 Satvtrday 
13 Wednesday 
16 Saturday 
18 Monday 

21 Thursday 
27 Wednesday 

30 Saturday 

November 

4 Thursday 

6 Saturday 

7 Sunday 



Lasell @ Brandeis University 

Lasell @ Becker College 

Lasell @ Fitchburg State 

College 

LASELL vs. WHEATON COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. ANNA MARIA 

COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. MIT 

Lasell @ Mass College of Liberal Arts 

Lasell @ Southern Vermont CoUege 



LASELL vs. BABSON COLLEGE 
LaseU @ Suffolk University 
LdseU @ Mt. Ida College 
LASELL vs.. ELMS COLLEGE 
LaseU @ Daniel Webster College 
LASELL vs. UMASS DARTMOUTH 
LaseU @ StonehiU CoUege 
Lasell vs. Nichols CoUege 



NAC Quarterfinals 
NAC Semi-finals 
NAC Finals 



4:00 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
5:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 



TEA 
TEA 



3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
TBA 
TBA 

4:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 



1:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. * 
10:00 a.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 



4:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m.* 
3:00 p.m.* 

3:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

2:30 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 



2:30 p.m. 
TBA 
TBA 



'Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 1999 

September 

8 Wednesday 
13 Monday 



15 Thursday 

20 Monday 
23 Thursday 

25 Saturday 
28 Tuesday 

October 

1 Friday 
4 Monday 
7 Thursday 
9 Saturday 
12 Tuesday 

16 Saturday 
20 Wednesday 
23 Saturday 
25 Monday 

28 Thursday 

30 Saturday 

31 Sunday 



LaseU @ Mt. Ida CoUege 

LASELL vs. PINE MANOR 

COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. NOTRE DAME 

COLLEGE 

LaseU @ Eastern Nazarene College 

LASELL vs. DANIEL WEBSTER 

COLLEGE 

Lasell @ Elms CoUege 

LASELL vs. UMASS BOSTON 



4:00 p.m.» 
4:00 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 

12:00 p.m.* 
4:00 p.m. 



LASELL vs. LESLEY COLLEGE 4:00 p.m.* 

LASELL vs. BECKER COLLEGE 4:00 p.m.* 

LaseU @ Daniel Webster CoUege 4:00 p.m. 

LASELL vs. MT. IDA COLLEGE 1 :00 p.m. 

LASELL vs. EMERSON COLLEGE 4:00 p.m.* 
LASELL vs. LESLEY COLLEGE 10:30 a.m.* 

LaseU @ Johnson & Wales Uruversity 4:00 p.m. 
UseU @ Bay Path College 1:30 p.m.* 

LASELL vs. EMMANUEL COLLEGE 3:00 p.m. 
Quarterfinals NAC TBA 

Semi-finals NAC TBA 

Finals NAC TBA 



*Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



Lasell ® Pine Manor College 7:00 p.m. 

Lasell @ MCLA Tri match 12:00 p.m. 

LASELL vs. ATLANTIC UNION 2:00 p.m. 

COLLEGE 

Lasell ® Johnson & Wales University 7:00 p.m. 

Lasell @ Daniel Webster College 7:00 p.m. 

LASELL vs. BAY PATH, TRI w/ 1:30 p.m.* 

NEWBURY 

Lasell ® Wentworth Institute 7:00 p.m. 

LASELL vs. MT. IDA COLLEGE 7:00 p.m.* 

Lasell ® Becker College 1 :00 p.m.* 

LASELL vs. ANNA MARIA 7:00 p.m. 

COLLEGE 

Lasell @ Wentworth w/ UMASS Boston TBA 



September 

9 Thursday 

11 Saturday 

12 Sunday 

13 Monday 
16 Thursday 
18 Satiu-day 

20 Monday 

21 Tuesday 
25 Saturday 
29 Wednesday 

October 

2 Saturday 
4 Monday 
7 Thursday 

9 Saturday 
11 Monday 
13 Wednesday 

16 Saturday 

17 Sunday 
20 Wednesday 
23 Saturday 
28 Thursday 

November 

6 Saturday 
13 Saturday 

*Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



LASELL vs. RlVlER COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. DANIEL WEBSTER 

COLLEGE 

Lasell @ Suffolk Tri w/MCLA 

Lasell @ Regis 

LASELL vs. JOHNSON & WALES 

UNIVERSITY 

LASELL vs. BECKER COLLEGE 

Lasell ® Atlantic Union College 

LASELL vs. EMERSON COLLEGE 

Conn. College Tournament 

Lasell @ Mt. Ida College 



NAC Championship Tournament 
MAIAW Championships 



7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 

TBA 
7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m.* 

2.00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

TBA 

7:00 p.m.* 



TBA 
TBA 



FIELD HOCKEY 1999 



September 

10 Friday 
12 Sunday 
18 Saturday 
24 Friday 
27 Monday 



Lasell @ Nichols College 4:00 p.m. 

LaseU @ St. Joseph College ( ME.) 1:00 p.m. 

LaseU @ Eastern Cormecticut College TBA 

LASELL vs. ELMS COLLEGE 4:00 p.m.* 

Lasell @ Western New England 4:00 p.m. 
College 

29 Wednesday LASELL vs. WHEELOCK 4:00 p.m.* 



October 

2 Saturday Lasell @ Wheelock College 
5 Tuesday LaseU @ Becker College 
13 Wednesday Lasell @ Regis 
23 Sahirday LASELL vs. FITCHBURG STATE 
COLLEGE 

30 Saturday Semi-finals NAC 

31 Sunday Finals NAC 

*Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



TBA* 

4:00 p.m.* 

4:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

TBA 
TBA 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 99-00 

November 

19 Friday 



20 Saturday 

23 Tuesday 
30 Tuesday 

December 

2 Thursday 



LaseU @ College of New Jersey 

Tournament 

LaseU @ College of New Jersey 

Tournament 

LASELL vs. GORDON COLLEGE 

LaseU ® Mt. Ida CoUege 



TBA 



TBA 



LASELL vs. EASTERN 
NAZARENE COLLEGE 

3 Friday Lasell @ Williams Tournament 

4 Saturday Lasell ® Williams Tournament 

8 Wednesday LASELL vs. DANIEL WEBSTER 

COLLEGE 
13 Monday Lasell @ Keene State CoUege 

28 Tuesday Lasell @ Western Connecticut 

University Tournament 

29 Wednesday Lasell @ Western Cormecticut 

University Tournament 



January 

13 Thursday 

16 Sunday 

18 Tuesday 

20 Thursday 
22 Saturday 
26 Wednesday 
31 Monday 

February 

3 Wednesday 
5 Saturday 
9 Wednesday 
12 Saturday 
15 Tuesday 

17 Thursday 
24 Thursday 

26 Saturday 

27 Sunday 



LASELL vs. ANNA MARL\ 

COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. JOHNSON STATE 

COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. FITCHBURG STATE 

COLLEGE 

LaseU @ Curry College 

LASELL vs. ELMS COLLEGE 

LaseU ® Becker College 

LaseU ® New England College 



LASELL vs. MT. IDA COLLEGE 
Lasell @ Maine Maritime 
LASELL vs. BECKER COLLEGE 
Lasell @ Endicott College 
Lasell @ Elms College 
LASELL vs. NEWBURY COLLEGE 
NAC Quarterfinals 
Semi-finals NAC 
Finals NAC 



7:00 p.m. 
6:00 p.m.* 



8:00 p.m. 

TBA 
TBA 

7:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 
TBA 

TBA 



6:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m.* 
7:00 p.m.* 

7:00 p.m. 



7:00 p.m.* 

12:00 p.m.* 

7:00 p.m.* 

TBA 

6:00 p.m.* 

6:00 p.m. 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 99-00 

November 

19 Friday 



20 Saturday 

23 Tuesday 
29 Monday 

December 

2 Thursday 



Saturday 

Sunday 

Thursday 



LASELL COLLEGE TIP-OFF TBA 

TOURNAMENT 

LASELL COLLEGE TIP-OFF TBA 

TOURNAMENT 

Lasell ® Daniel Webster College 8:00 p.m. 

Lasell ® Becker College 7:00 p.m.* 



LASELL vs. EASTERN 6:00 p.m. 

NAZARENE COLLEGE 
Lasell @ Russell Sage Tournament TBA 

Lasell @ Russell Sage Tournament TBA 

LASELL vs. WHEELOCK COLLEGE 7:00 p.m.* 



11 Saturday 
13 Monday 

January 

16 Sunday 

18 Tuesday 
20 Thursday 
22 Saturday 
26 Wednesday 
28 Friday 
30 Sunday 

February 

3 Thursday 
8 Tuesday 
10 Thursday 

12 Saturday 

15 Tuesday 

17 Thursday 
20 Sunday 
24 Thursday 

26 Saturday 

27 Sunday 



Lasell @ Maine Maritime Academy 
LASELL vs. JOHNSON & WALES 
UNIVERSITY 

LASELL vs. JOHNSON STATE 
COLLEGE 

LASELL vs. LESLEY COLLEGE 
Lasell ® Emerson College 
Lasell vs. Tufts University 
LASELL vs. BAY PATH COLLEGE 
Lasell @ Notre Dame CoUege 
Lasell ® Wheelock College 



Lasell @ Lesley CoUege 

LASELL vs. BECKER COLLEGE 

Lasell @ Mt. Ida College 

LASELL vs. MAINE MARITIME 

ACADEMY 

Lasell @ Elms College 

LASELL vs. NEWBURY COLLEGE 

Lasell ® Bay Path College 

NAC Quarterfinals 

Semi-finals NAC 

Finals 



12:00 p.m». 
7:00 p.m. 



12:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m.* 
7:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 

7:30 p.m.* 
6:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m.* 



7:00 p.m.* 
7:00 p.m.* 
7:00 p.m.* 
1:00 p.m.* 

8:00 p.m.* 
8:00 p.m. 

1:30 p.m.* 
TBA 
TBA 
TBA 



*Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



MEN'S AND WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



September 

17 
24 

October 

2 
9 

16 
23 



Lasell @ Rivier Invitational 
Lasell @ Fitchburg Invitational 



LaseU @ Babson Invitational 
Lasell @ Roger WUliams Invitational 
Lasell @ Regis Invitational 
Lasell @ Rivier Invitational 



12 



LASELL 

COLLEGE 




*Denotes North Atlantic Conference game 



WINTER/SPRING 1999 

© 1999, Lasell College. 
All rights reserved. 

LaseU Leaves is distributed twice a year, 
free of charge to alumni, students, and 
friends of LaseU. 

Tlie pubUcation is produced by 

The Office of Institutional Advancement 

LaseU CoUege 

1844 Commonwealtih Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Tel (617) 243-2141 

Dean for Institutional Advancement 
Ruth S. Shuman 

Editor 

Fran WeU 

Class Notes Editor 
EUen Bresnahan 

Director of Support Services 

Jeanne A. Johnsen '72 

Layout/Printing 
Signature Communications 



^v 



$ 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



WINTER/SPRING 1999